International Projects

 

We have carried out several educational projects in Latin America in the context of the OLPC project (One Laptop per Child - One Computer per Child): Uruguay, Argentina, Paraguay, Peru and Mexico.

We have also collaborated with the Ministries of Education of the Dominican Republic and the Republic of Colombia in the “Computational Thinking” project.

 

We also collaborate in the European project IRNet (International Research Network for study and development of new tools and methods for advanced pedagogical science in the field of ICT instruments, e-learning and intercultural competences) with Eugenia Smyrnova-Trybulska

University of Silesia in Katowice · Faculty of Ethnology and Educational Science.

República Dominicana Computational Thinking

 

This project was carried out during the 2015-16 and 2016-17 academic years. It is an innovative solution for the Introduction of Computational Thinking in Dominican schools with the collaboration of the Ministry of Education of the Dominican Republic (MINERD) through the General Directorate of Educational Informatics.

República de Colombia
Computational Thinking

 

This project was developed in the 2016-17 academic year. It is an innovative solution for the Introduction of Computational Thinking in Colombian schools with the collaboration of RENATA and the ICT Ministry.

 

PC-01: Introduction to Computational Thinking

IRNet European Project

 

The integration of Information and Communication Technologies in Higher Education just started by allowing students and teachers to interact via Web-based Electronic Support Systems. However, a much wider impact of ICT has been signaled and demonstrated in the underlying European IRNet Project. Its consortium from Eastern- and Western European countries and Australia illustrates that international student exchange, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) and enabling mutual learning among teachers and university policy makers is needed further and also needs strategic investments in order to climb on the ladder of benchmarking and thus to attract the better students. The chapters in the book before you show that building internationally intertwined consortia is no longer a cosmetic aspect; it has become a vital attractor for students and staff with higher ambitions.